Adults with Autism Employment

autistic melt down telephone

My name is Keith. My father is the owner and publisher of this website – I am the son he refers to :).   I am diagnosed with ASD since I was 10. Many Autistic adults only get diagnosed when they are adults, unlike in my case. This post is based on my personal experiences. I will add more as time goes on.

Adults with Autism Employment

Adults in the Autism Spectrum interacting with the Neurotypical world involves many contentious issues. Employment is no exception in this manner, especially since it involves interacting effectively with a would-be employer who likely would pick up slight communication defects such as a monotonous voice or speech slur or maybe involuntary fidgeting, stimming etc. To actively pursue a career on the open job market as an Autistic Adult and successfully acquire it is often quite a feat all on its own.

How can this be addressed? Job placements via organisations for Autistic Adults are a very good start, yet only in very few developing countries with a low unemployment rate is such a facility available. Not to say that undeveloped countries don’t have sufficient NGOs they often don’t have control over factors outside their control which is part and parcel of living in an undeveloped country.

Regrettably, they don’t so in places like most of Latin America, Continental Africa, and many parts of Asia where economic turbulence is the order of the day. Unfortunately, they can only assist Autistic adults up to a certain point and beyond that point, they are in the corporate wilderness with the rest of the population in a very competitive, high stress and very often unforgiving environment. The lucky ones normally get helped through relatives or contacts of close family friends and in such circumstances being different and possibly perceptions of nepotism, leading to hostility and bullying from fellow employees.

Even in developed Western countries like USA, Canada, EU bloc, Australia, the corporate world isn’t always kind to Autistic employees for the very same reason. To the Autistic Adult, it seems, and often is true, that NT (Neurotypical) people take pleasure in tormenting Autistic individuals or clash with them often resulting in the Autistic employee quitting the job or, worse, being dismissed. An Autistic person’s decision to quit a job is frequently catastrophic in the long run. Because, I know, from personal experience, that we are often not easily employable.

Conclusion

In spite of all the mentioned adversities faced by Autistic Adults on the job market, many have made a name for themselves. Rumour has it that Bill Gates is ASD and Einstein himself was Autistic.

You may have seen this impressive list of successful people on the spectrum (click on that).

Yet many companies, especially in the High tech/IT field, have successfully integrated adults with Autism through pilot projects building on ASD special skills and company policy regarding Autistic Adults and their typical attention to detail is a highly prized skill. Click on this heading below to see a list from “Verywellhealth” of

Top 10 Autism Friendly Employers

However, the IT field is just one small example of where Autistic people thrive it is no secret that some of the best hackers and programmers are as a matter of fact Autistic themselves.

Another example would be fine arts and historical research. It is not uncommon to find Autistic people being curators in historical fields that interest them (and that they may be obsessive about), be it Ancient Egypt or the Second World War.

I for one, know, for example,  such an individual who partakes in historical re-enactments and is a museum curator. The best secret is to uncover the Autistic individuals’ niche/hobby/interest/obsession and guide him/her in such a direction  – the results may be surprising!

autistic aduls and NT at work site

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